Computer Science Teachers Association Standards (CSTA)

Any Hummingbird project will meet this standard.

A Hummingbird project can be designed to meet this standard.

A project has not yet been created to meet this standard.

Grades 3-5

PE Code Standard Application Related Projects
1B-CS-01

Describe how internal and external parts of computing devices function to form a system.

Students can meet this standard by looking at how each Hummingbird component works together to form a system.

All Projects
1B-CS-02

Model how computer hardware and software work together as a system to accomplish tasks.

Students can meet this standard by building a robot (hardware) and writing a program to control it (software).

All Projects
1B-CS-03

Determine potential solutions to solve simple hardware and software problems using common troubleshooting strategies.

To create a successful Hummingbird robot, students will need to troubleshoot both their robot (hardware) and the program that controls it (software).

All Projects
1B-CS-04

Model how information is broken down into smaller pieces, transmitted as packets through multiple devices over networks and the Internet, and reassembled at the destination.

-
1B-CS-05

Discuss real-world cybersecurity problems and how personal information can be protected.

-
1B-DA-06

Organize and present collected data visually to highlight relationships and support a claim.

Students can use sensors in Scratch or Snap to collect, visually represent, and interpret data. For example, students can plot their sensor data on a graph and propose relationships.

-
1B-DA-07

Use data to highlight or propose cause-and-effect relationships, predict outcomes, or communicate an idea.

Energy Transformations Using Hummingbird Robotics
1B-AP-08

Compare and refine multiple algorithms for the same task and determine which is the most appropriate.

This evaluation will occur naturally as students compare solutions to a Hummingbird challenge.

All Projects
1B-AP-09

Create programs that use variables to store and modify data.

Variables can be used to store sensor data or keep track of the score in a Hummingbird game.

Intermediate: Creating a Game with Hummingbird
1B-AP-10

Create programs that include sequences, events, loops, and conditionals.

Students will do this as they design programs for the Hummingbird.

All Projects
1B-AP-11

Decompose (break down) problems into smaller, manageable subproblems to facilitate the program development process.

Students will do this as they design programs for the Hummingbird.

All Projects
1B-AP-12

Modify, remix, or incorporate portions of an existing program into one’s own work, to develop something new or add more advanced features.

This will occur naturally as students compare solutions to a Hummingbird challenge.

All Projects
1B-AP-13

Use an iterative process to plan the development of a program by including others’ perspectives and considering user preferences.

Many Hummingbird projects incorporate peer review and revision in an iterative process.

All Projects
1B-AP-14

Observe intellectual property rights and give appropriate attribution when creating or remixing programs.

This could be incorporated into any Hummingbird project.

All Projects
1B-AP-15

Test and debug (identify and fix errors) a program or algorithm to ensure it runs as intended.

Students will do this as they create and program a robot.

All Projects
1B-AP-16

Take on varying roles, with teacher guidance, when collaborating with peers during the design, implementation, and review stages of program development.

Students will exhibit these skills while working in a team on a Hummingbird project.

All Projects
1B-AP-17

Describe choices made during program development using code comments, presentations, and demonstrations.

Students typically defend their design decisions while presenting their Hummingbird project to the class or community.

All Projects
1B-AP-18

Discuss computing technologies that have changed the world, and express how those technologies influence, and are influenced by, cultural practices.

-
1B-IC-19

Brainstorm ways to improve the accessibility and usability of technology products for the diverse needs and wants of users.

Design thinking can be incorporated into a variety of Hummingbird projects.

Design Thinking and Robotics
1B-IC-20

Seek diverse perspectives for the purpose of improving computational artifacts.

This can be incorporated into a Hummingbird project that uses the Hummingbird to prototype an invention.

Energy Saving Prototypes
1B-IC-21

Use public domain or creative commons media, and refrain from copying or using material created by others without permission.

-

Grades 6-8

PE Code Standard Application Related Projects
2-CS-01

Recommend improvements to the design of computing devices, based on an analysis of how users interact with the devices.

Many Hummingbird projects incorporate peer review and revision in an iterative process.

All Projects
2-CS-02

Design projects that combine hardware and software components to collect and exchange data.

Students can design Hummingbird projects that use sensors to collect data.

All Projects
2-CS-03

Systematically identify and fix problems with computing devices and their components.

To create a successful Hummingbird robot, students will need to troubleshoot both their robot (hardware) and the program that controls it (software).

All Projects
2-CS-04

Model the role of protocols in transmitting data across networks and the Internet.

-
2-CS-05

Explain how physical and digital security measures protect electronic information.

-
2-CS-06

Apply multiple methods of encryption to model the secure transmission of information.

-
2-DA-07

Represent data using multiple encoding schemes.

Students can represent data in a variety of ways using inputs and outputs of the Hummingbird kit, with or without digital animations from Scratch or Snap!

Codes with Binary
2-CS-08

Collect data using computational tools and transform the data to make it more useful and reliable.

-
2-CS-09

Refine computational models based on the data they have generated.

-
2-AP-10

Use flowcharts and/or pseudocode to address complex problems as algorithms.

As students create more complex Hummingbird programs, planning tools such as pseudocode become increasingly important.

All Projects
2-AP-11

Create clearly named variables that represent different data types and perform operations on their values.

Variables can be used to store and process sensor data. For example, you can use variables to find the maximum or minimum light value that the robot has sensed.

-
2-AP-12

Design and iteratively develop programs that combine control structures, including nested loops and compound conditionals.

Students will do this as they design programs for the Hummingbird.

All Projects
2-AP-13

Decompose problems and subproblems into parts to facilitate the design, implementation, and review of programs.

Students will do this as they design programs for the Hummingbird.

All Projects
2-AP-14

Create procedures with parameters to organize code and make it easier to reuse.

As students create more complex Hummingbird programs, they should begin to use programming best practices, such as creating general procedures with parameters.

-
2-AP-15

Seek and incorporate feedback from team members and users to refine a solution that meets user needs.

Many Hummingbird projects incorporate peer review and revision in an iterative process.

All Projects
2-AP-16

Incorporate existing code, media, and libraries into original programs, and give attribution.

Students should give attribution whenever they use the work of others in a Hummingbird project.

All Projects
2-AP-17

Systematically test and refine programs using a range of test cases.

This will occur naturally as students test and debug their projects.

All Projects
2-AP-18

Distribute tasks and maintain a project timeline when collaboratively developing computational artifacts.

To complete a Hummingbird project successfully and on time, students can use a timeline to efficiently distribute tasks.

All Projects
2-AP-19

Document programs in order to make them easier to follow, test, and debug.

As students create more complex Hummingbird programs, they should begin to use programming best practices, such as documentation.

All Projects
2-AP-20

Compare tradeoffs associated with computing technologies that affect people’s everyday activities and career options.

-
2-AP-21

Discuss issues of bias and accessibility in the design of existing technologies.

-
2-AP-22

Collaborate with many contributors through strategies such as crowdsourcing or surveys when creating a computational artifact.

-
2-AP-23

Describe tradeoffs between allowing information to be public and keeping information private and secure.

-

Grades 9-10

PE Code Standard Application Related Projects
3A-CS-01

Explain how abstractions hide the underlying implementation details of computing systems embedded in everyday objects.

 

-
3A-CS-02

Compare levels of abstraction and interactions between application software, system software, and hardware layers.

Advanced students should be able to explain how they used abstraction in their program and how the Hummingbird hardware and software interact.

All Projects
3A-CS-03

Develop guidelines that convey systematic troubleshooting strategies that others can use to identify and fix errors.

This standard could be met by having a high school class develop materials for an elementary or middle school robotics project.

-
3A-CS-04

Evaluate the scalability and reliability of networks, by describing the relationship between routers, switches, servers, topology, and addressing.

-
3A-CS-05

Give examples to illustrate how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

-
3A-CS-06

Recommend security measures to address various scenarios based on factors such as efficiency, feasibility, and ethical impacts.

-
3A-CS-07

Compare various security measures, considering tradeoffs between the usability and security of a computing system.

-
3A-CS-08

Explain tradeoffs when selecting and implementing cybersecurity recommendations.

-
3A-CS-09

Translate between different bit representations of real-world phenomena, such as characters, numbers, and images.

-
3A-CS-10

Evaluate the tradeoffs in how data elements are organized and where data is stored.

-
3A-CS-11

Create interactive data visualizations using software tools to help others better understand real-world phenomena.

-
3A-CS-12

Create computational models that represent the relationships among different elements of data collected from a phenomenon or process.

-
3A-AP-13

Create prototypes that use algorithms to solve computational problems by leveraging prior student knowledge and personal interests.

Advanced Hummingbird projects should enable students to be creative and pursue their own interests.

All Projects
3A-AP-14

Use lists to simplify solutions, generalizing computational problems instead of repeatedly using simple variables.

Students can use lists to store sensor data collected by a robot.

-
3A-AP-15

Justify the selection of specific control structures when tradeoffs involve implementation, readability, and program performance, and explain the benefits and drawbacks of choices made.

Students typically defend their design decisions while presenting their Hummingbird project to the class or community.

All Projects
3A-AP-16

Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using events to initiate instructions.

Advanced Hummingbird projects should enable students to be creative and pursue their own interests.

All Projects
3A-AP-17

Decompose problems into smaller components through systematic analysis, using constructs such as procedures, modules, and/or objects.

This standard can be incorporated into advanced Hummingbird projects.

All Projects
3A-AP-18

Create artifacts by using procedures within a program, combinations of data and procedures, or independent but interrelated programs.

This standard can be incorporated into advanced Hummingbird projects.

All Projects
3A-AP-19

Systematically design and develop programs for broad audiences by incorporating feedback from users.

Many Hummingbird projects incorporate peer review and revision in an iterative process.

-
3A-CS-20

Evaluate licenses that limit or restrict use of computational artifacts when using resources such as libraries.

-
3A-AP-21

Evaluate and refine computational artifacts to make them more usable and accessible.

Many Hummingbird projects incorporate peer review and revision in an iterative process.

All Projects
3A-AP-22

Design and develop computational artifacts working in team roles using collaborative tools.

Students will work in teams on a Hummingbird project.

All Projects
3A-AP-23

Document design decisions using text, graphics, presentations, and/or demonstrations in the development of complex programs.

Students typically defend their design decisions while presenting their Hummingbird project to the class or community.

All Projects
3A-CS-24

Evaluate the ways computing impacts personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural practices.

-
3A-CS-25

Test and refine computational artifacts to reduce bias and equity deficits.

-
3A-CS-26

Demonstrate ways a given algorithm applies to problems across disciplines.

-
3A-CS-27

Use tools and methods for collaboration on a project to increase connectivity of people in different cultures and career fields.

-
3A-CS-28

Explain the beneficial and harmful effects that intellectual property laws can have on innovation.

-
3A-CS-29

Explain the privacy concerns related to the collection and generation of data through automated processes that may not be evident to users.

-
3A-CS-30

Evaluate the social and economic implications of privacy in the context of safety, law, or ethics.

-