Simple Robots

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Little Bot

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Little Bot

Meet the Little Bot built with the Hummingbird Robotics Kit, or “Elby” for short. This robot uses 2 servos to control a 2 axis head.

We recommend that you build Elby with 2 3x3x3 boxes and the full-sized position servos, but this robot can also be made using any small box that you have available. It can also be made using the Micro Servos that come with the Hummingbird Base Kit. If you do not have 3x3x3 boxes or the full-sized servos, be prepared to get creative and improvise with the design.

Build Time: 45-75 min (depending on skill level and design choice)

Take a look at this video if you are not using 3x3x3 boxes and the full-sized servos:

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Hummingbird Robotics Kit Hardware*

  • Hummingbird Controller (Bit Controller pictured. Duo controller will also work)
  • Battery Pack or AC Plug
  • 2 Position Servos (Your servo may look different)
  • 1 Circular Servo Horn with Servo Screw
  • 1 Additional Servo Horn (Any shape)

*All of these parts are included in any Hummingbird Robotics Kit

Suggested Craft Supplies

  • Hot Glue Gun
  • Scissors
  • Blade
  • Marker
  • Pencil
  • Masking Tape
  • Screwdriver
  • Small Coin (or something with which to trace a small circle)
  • 2 Small Cardboard Cardboard Boxes with Flaps (For beginners, we have found the 3x3x3 box works best)

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Start by taping one side of each cardboard box shut.

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Cut the tabs off of one box. Set them aside. You will need some of these tabs later.

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Create some eyes for your Little Robot. We traced a small coin to make circles, but you can make any shape you want! Use a blade to cut out your robot’s eyes.

Tip: If you are using a 3x3x3 box, the eyes should not exceed 1″ in diameter.

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Place a piece of making tape on one of the tabs. This tab will become your robot’s eyes.

Hot glue the tab into the box so that the tape surface is lined up with the holes you created in the previous step.

Use a marker to draw some eyes for your robot.

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Place the circular servo horn on the shaft of a position servo and screw it into place.

Place the other servo horn (we used the “X” servo horn, but you can use any servo horn that you have available) on the other position servo and screw it into place.

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Choose which side of your box will be the top. Place the position servo with the circular servo horn on the center-top of the box. Trace around the base of the servo. Use the blade to cut out a rectangular hole for the servo. Be sure to cut inside the line. This will ensure that the servo has a nice, snug fit.

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We want to make sure our robots can look both left and right, so we have to make sure our servo is calibrated. To do this, turn the servo clockwise until it stops. This is position 0. When your robot looks all the way to the right, this will be the servo position.

Turn the servo 90 degrees counter clockwise. When your robot looks forward, this will be the servo position. Keep the servo at position 90 for the remainder of the build.

Hot glue the second servo to the circular servo horn.

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To ensure that the robot’s head is centered on its body we will need to make some spacers. Cut one of the tabs in half. This will create 2 squares. Glue the first square to the “X” servo horn. Glue the second square to the first square. Just as we did before, we need to make sure that this servo is calibrated. Turn it clockwise until the position servo stops, then turn it 90 degrees.

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Glue the inside of the head to the second cardboard square.

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Close the tabs and tape up the body. Make sure to leave the ends of the servo wires outside the box.

You are now ready to start programming! Need help getting started? Select your desired programming language and device from this page.